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20130216
20130216
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
it training, i particularly liked the gun -- at the end. but there wasn't come in richard nixon's turn, the lift of a driving dream. >> colby? >> i don't think it was supposed to be the kind of address. i think he laid out an agenda he wants to pursue. i think he will achieve some of it. it will happen with immigration reform, i believe it, maybe not to the extent he wants. i think he will get something on guns. there is a movement out there and he hit it just right, the tone on it. minimum wage will be the traditional fight, but i think he was right to lay down the agenda that he wants to he will have to pursue it with the democrats because he will get very little support from republicans. >> nina, put your schoolmarm face on. on a grade of a to f, what would you give the speech? >> b+. there was a certain laundry list element to the speech, which it there is with every state of the union. in the end, it ended on a high note and a passionate note on bonds, and there was an overall tone, which was center-left but reasonable, and he did not come off looking as silly and sort of way over
about. richard nixon, who was eisenhower's vice president, said that eisenhower was more complicated and devious than most people realize, and then nixon said i mean devious in the best sense of the word. [laughter] now, ike was human. the stress did get to him. he had a heart attack in 1955, a stroke in 1957, chronic stomach problems, a stomach operation in 1956. one of the most useful records of ike's life is the diary that was kept by his personal doctor, howard snyder. and the diary's very explicit about the medications and his mood. they were worried about his mood, because they were afraid that high blood pressure and that he would pop a cork, and it would give him another heart attack. so the doctors were always telling eisenhower not to worry so much, and he would say just what do you think this job is? of course he worried. he had a lot to worry about. and he occasionally erupted. he threw his golf club at his doctor and almost broke his leg, not exactly great sportsmanship, but it was on the same day that eisenhower was deciding whether or whether or not to do a u2 flight o
of president richard nixon. "washington journal" continues. host: bob schoshinski is joining us of the ftc. credit ratings agency -- credit rating agencies, the first of their kind -- what is that? guest: this is a report by that imposed certain responsibilities for certain credit reporting agencies. for instance, the credit reporting act requires credit reporting agencies to have procedures to ensure maximum possible accuracy of the information the report. it gives consumers the right to check their credit report and point out any inaccuracies that are in them and dispute them with the credit reporting agencies. it requires the agency's to investigate those disputes. in 2003 when congress amended the act, they said to the ftc, who is one of the agencies that enforces the act, we would like to see a report on the accuracy of credit reports. over the course of 10 years, the commission has engaged in this study to look at credit reports and determine the accuracy. it is unique because it follows the process all the way -- all the way through, from the consumer looking at the credit report, t
richard nixon in the 1970's, overwhelming support by the senate and died on the president's death. this isn't the first time that the president is thinking of some sort of bold plan in his second term to try to do this, but it's at a heavy, heavy cost and the benefit is the question. we have a 48-year-old experiment that may it will us something about whether or not this will work, it's called head start. we've spent untold billions on head start since the johnson administration received more publicity, good publicity than any other federal program and the results are in. no long-term benefit to head start. now, why is that? i'm not against head start on principle. why hasn't it worked? shouldn't we figure it out before we mandate for everyone. >> you're talking the health and human services, while it helps them become more, kindergarten through third grade shows no benefit. as opposed to the control group and for what the president is proposing, 98 billion dollars over ten years, again, i think that people might be willing to pay that if it showed what the president was promising
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)